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underthemountainbunker:

The time is rapidly approaching when the movement is going to have to offer concrete solutions to the problems posed by Wall Street. To do that, it will need a short but powerful list of demands. There are thousands one could make, but I’d suggest focusing on five:

1. Break up the monopolies. The so-called “Too Big to Fail” financial companies – now sometimes called by the more accurate term “Systemically Dangerous Institutions” – are a direct threat to national security. They are above the law and above market consequence, making them more dangerous and unaccountable than a thousand mafias combined. There are about 20 such firms in America, and they need to be dismantled; a good start would be to repeal the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and mandate the separation of insurance companies, investment banks and commercial banks.

2. Pay for your own bailouts. A tax of 0.1 percent on all trades of stocks and bonds and a 0.01 percent tax on all trades of derivatives would generate enough revenue to pay us back for the bailouts, and still have plenty left over to fight the deficits the banks claim to be so worried about. It would also deter the endless chase for instant profits through computerized insider-trading schemes like High Frequency Trading, and force Wall Street to go back to the job it’s supposed to be doing, i.e., making sober investments in job-creating businesses and watching them grow.

3. No public money for private lobbying. A company that receives a public bailout should not be allowed to use the taxpayer’s own money to lobby against him. You can either suck on the public teat or influence the next presidential race, but you can’t do both. Butt out for once and let the people choose the next president and Congress.

4. Tax hedge-fund gamblers. For starters, we need an immediate repeal of the preposterous and indefensible carried-interest tax break, which allows hedge-fund titans like Stevie Cohen and John Paulson to pay taxes of only 15 percent on their billions in gambling income, while ordinary Americans pay twice that for teaching kids and putting out fires. I defy any politician to stand up and defend that loophole during an election year.

5. Change the way bankers get paid. We need new laws preventing Wall Street executives from getting bonuses upfront for deals that might blow up in all of our faces later. It should be: You make a deal today, you get company stock you can redeem two or three years from now. That forces everyone to be invested in his own company’s long-term health – no more Joe Cassanos pocketing multimillion-dollar bonuses for destroying the AIGs of the world.

It would be interesting to see what problems the Republican Plutocracy had with any of these demands. 

(Source: Rolling Stone, via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

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pieceinthepuzzlehumanity:

“A former New York detective admitted in court that it was common practice to plant drugs on innocent people in order to meet arrest quotas. Stephen Anderson, one of eight cops arrested in the scandal, admitted he planted cocaine on four men in a Queens bar in 2008 in order to help his coworker improve his arrest numbers. “It was something I was seeing a lot of, whether it was from supervisors or undercovers and even investigators,” said Anderson. The city paid $300,000 to settle a lawsuit brought by two men falsely arrested by Anderson and his partner.”

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

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brooklynmutt:

Called “We Are the 1 Percent,” the new site piggybacks off the blog “We Are the 99 Percent,” on which Americans having a hard time during the recession sound off about exactly how the financial industry and particular government machinations have caused them to lose their jobs, their homes, their sanity. We Are the 1 Percent is a bit different. While the goal is still the same—to support the elimination of income inequality in the United States—the blog’s entries are made up entirely of contributions from the super-rich. Some of the contributors inherited their money, others made a killing on the stock market, but all of them agree that it’s time to redistribute some of their fortunes to others in need.

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

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occupywallstreet:

Here are the highlights:

  • Of those who had an opinion on the occupation, 54% were favourable to the movement, with only 23% against (25% very favourable and 29% somewhat favourable, compared to 10% somewhat unfavourable and 13% very unfavourable)
  • 86% agree that Wall Street has too much influence in Washington.
  • 79% agree that the income gap in the United States is too large.
  • An amazing 71% agree that financial executives who had a hand in the 2008 crisis should be prosecuted!
  • 68% agree that the rich should pay more in taxes, and 73% agree that we should raise taxes on those who make $1 million or more a year. 74% agree that raising taxes on millionaires would NOT ‘hurt the economic recovery,’ contrary to the Republican panic.
  • Unfortunately, 56% believe that the protest will have little impact on the overall situation, but 30% believe it will have a positive impact.

While we should always be careful not to put too much stock in these polls, this one at least has some good news for those who support #OWS.

KEEP IT UP! People are listening!

(via carton-rouge-deactivated2013051)

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whipporwill:

Conservative journalist says he infiltrated, escalated D.C. museum protest

A conservative journalist has admitted to infiltrating the group of protesters who clashed with security at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum on Saturday — and he openly claims to have helped instigate the events that prompted the museum to close.
Patrick Howley, an assistant editor at the American Spectator, says that he joined the group under the pretense that he was a demonstrator. “As far as anyone knew I was part of this cause — a cause that I had infiltrated the day before in order to mock and undermine in the pages of The American Spectator,” Howley wrote. (The language in the story has since been changed without explanation.)
A group called the October 2011 movement had organized the march in order to protest the U.S. government’s use of unmanned drones overseas, joined by a few members of the D.C. branch of the Occupy Wall Street movement, as the Post reported Saturday. Howley writes that a small number of protesters—himself included—had tried to move past the security guards at the main entrance of the museum. He says that one protester next to him got into a shoving match with a security guard in an antechamber before they hit the second set of doors that led to the museum itself. The guard pepper-sprayed the protester, spraying Howley as well.
But, according to his account, Howley was determined to escalate the protest further. “I wasn’t giving up before I had my story,” he writes, describing how he continued to rush past security into the museum itself. “I strained to glance behind me at the dozens of protesters I was sure were backing me up, and then I got hit again, this time with a cold realization: I was the only one who had made it through the doors….So I was surprised to find myself a fugitive Saturday afternoon, stumbling around aircraft displays with just enough vision to keep tabs on my uniformed pursuers. ‘The museum is now closed!’ screamed one of the guards as alarms sounded. ‘Everyone make your way to the exits immediately!’”

whipporwill:

Conservative journalist says he infiltrated, escalated D.C. museum protest

A conservative journalist has admitted to infiltrating the group of protesters who clashed with security at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum on Saturday — and he openly claims to have helped instigate the events that prompted the museum to close.

Patrick Howley, an assistant editor at the American Spectator, says that he joined the group under the pretense that he was a demonstrator. “As far as anyone knew I was part of this cause — a cause that I had infiltrated the day before in order to mock and undermine in the pages of The American Spectator,” Howley wrote. (The language in the story has since been changed without explanation.)

A group called the October 2011 movement had organized the march in order to protest the U.S. government’s use of unmanned drones overseas, joined by a few members of the D.C. branch of the Occupy Wall Street movement, as the Post reported Saturday. Howley writes that a small number of protesters—himself included—had tried to move past the security guards at the main entrance of the museum. He says that one protester next to him got into a shoving match with a security guard in an antechamber before they hit the second set of doors that led to the museum itself. The guard pepper-sprayed the protester, spraying Howley as well.

But, according to his account, Howley was determined to escalate the protest further. “I wasn’t giving up before I had my story,” he writes, describing how he continued to rush past security into the museum itself. “I strained to glance behind me at the dozens of protesters I was sure were backing me up, and then I got hit again, this time with a cold realization: I was the only one who had made it through the doors….So I was surprised to find myself a fugitive Saturday afternoon, stumbling around aircraft displays with just enough vision to keep tabs on my uniformed pursuers. ‘The museum is now closed!’ screamed one of the guards as alarms sounded. ‘Everyone make your way to the exits immediately!’”

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

Tags: politics ows
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atheistsblog:

Two hands working can do more than a million clasped in prayer.

atheistsblog:

Two hands working can do more than a million clasped in prayer.

(via artisawaynotathing)

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PLEASE for the sake of skewing it from mostly Pro-FoxNews voters to mostly against FoxNews voters. VOTE IN THIS POLL

PLEASE for the sake of skewing it from mostly Pro-FoxNews voters to mostly against FoxNews voters. VOTE IN THIS POLL

(via fuckyeahtattoos)

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